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Offline 2-Skinny

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Ryan Konkel
Sactown, California
========================================
1983 Celica GT-S Liftback
Parting Out....Farewell Celi-Cell...you were good to me!
--------------------------------------------


Offline Mew2Senshi: The Driver

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Post Cool Celica History Here
« Reply #16 on: Oct 21, 2005, 03:04:51 pm »
'85 Celica GT-S 22R-E 2.4L (144.4 CI), I-4, SOHC EFI  
Horsepower:
116 @ 4800
Torque:
140 @ 2800
Bore x Stroke
3.62 x 3.50
Compression Ratio:
9.3:1

One word for this: DAMN!
Searching for financial power to satify the cravings of my car-crazy psycho-fast!

Coming Soon:

Project: Unit Zero24 (1989 Cavalier Z24) (FWD)
Project: Celestia no Ryuu (3rd gen Celica GT-S) (RWD) (?)
Project: Akuma no Z (S30 Z-car)
Project: Sexy Silvia (S13 240SX)

Come see me at: MySpace

Offline Havoc0301

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Post Cool Celica History Here
« Reply #17 on: Apr 06, 2006, 01:19:50 am »
Im glad i watched that lil video. I had no idea what those 2 levers in side the door did. was popping them on each side for like 10 min trying to figure out what it did.
no rear wing window WTH?!?!
does it pop out the rear cover for the lift back?? Nope !!!
is it a 2nd option for lower the back seats?? Damn  it !!!! :angry:

but now i know :shades:  
85 Celica GT-S
     - NGK plugs
     - Rebuilt  Master/Slave on clutch

95 Jeep Grand Cheroke Limited
    -  K & N Filter
    - Pirelli Scorpion AT

80 Ford F-350 1-ton 4x4
    - 460 LOTS work (to much to list)  
    - 30% Overdrive
    - 35" Dick Cepeck
    - Tripple-Double Roll Bar


Offline a2ndopinion

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Post Cool Celica History Here
« Reply #18 on: Mar 20, 2007, 06:04:04 am »
The '79 I recently bought (Kermit) came with the factory owners manual. Would anyone be interested in my posting pics or scanned pages of it? It is in really good condition!
ASE certified: Master Auto, Truck, Machinist & Collision Repair/Refinish Tech/Damage Estimator, Undercar & Parts Specialist, Service Advisor; Oregon Certified Vehicle Appraiser
DD - '81 Corona wagon - Weber, Cannon, MSD, Thorley, Magnaflow cat, 2.25" mandrel bent, Dynomax Bullet, Borla Pro XS, RA6x front suspension, Cressi Big Brakes, Mk II Addco, T3 RCAs & camber plates, coilovers, SW20/Camaro AGXs front/rear, all urethane bushings, Hilux overlloads...

Offline celicaturtle

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Post Cool Celica History Here
« Reply #19 on: Apr 03, 2007, 05:32:17 am »
i got an owner's manual and another same kinda book, but different.  can't remember.  WOOT WOOT on paying tribute to the celica (cel ih cuh) history/legacy.
Ambition is a Dream with a V8 Engine -Elvis Presley

     1984 Celica GT-S Fastback *Charlotte*
                           Modifications
Hedman Hedders
2" exhaust system with loud muffler
Polished Aluminum Valve cover
Alpine 400w Bridged amp
twin JBL 10" Subs in Bandpass box
Sony Xplod speakers
Racing steering wheel
TRD Short Shifter
LED's under the dash
Open element filter with supra AFM
LSD
http://s100.photobucket.com/albums/m35/celicaturtle/

Offline celicaturtle

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Post Cool Celica History Here
« Reply #20 on: May 10, 2007, 04:22:13 pm »
Toyota Celica sporty cars
Hitting the road in 1971, the Celica was designed to be fun to drive without the need for endless thrust, with an independent front suspension, rear wheel drive, light weight, and a four-cylinder engine giving decent gas mileage and acceleration. In contrast to American coupes, the emphasis was on cornering and shifting rather than acceleration. The Celica was sold in more versions in Japan than in the rest of the world.

The basic design may derive from the 2000GT sports car, which had a considerably higher price (and greater performance), but which was largely designed by Yamaha, according to industry writers; while the name is Latin for “celestial.”

The Celica, in contrast to some vehicles of the time, provided full instrumentation, including an oil gauge and tachometer (except in the base LT model not sold in the US); and unlike many imports, it had American-style controls-on-the-dash in its first generation, but these would move to stalks by 1975.

The 1971 Celicas sold for about $2,600, putting them solidly in the middle of the general car market - below a well-optioned Valiant but far above any Toyota other than the Crown; it was 2,270 pounds, again light by American car standards but heavy by Toyota standards, where the Corolla topped out at 1,805 and the Corona at 2,170 (the Corona and Crown were heavier, the Crown by a large margin). The engine was an overhead valve four-cylinder, 3.48 x 3.15 inch bore and stroke, with an 8.5:1 compression ratio on the hottest 18R-C version. Recirculating-ball steering was used with a traditional front-engine, rear-drive layout, using MacPherson struts with coil springs up front and a rigid axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs in back. In 1971, only 309,363 Toyotas were sold in the US, and sales figures were not broken out.

In 1974, the first Celica GT model was brought out, bringing a five-speed manual transmission that squeezed more out of the engine and fatter tires that helped cornering; there was also a stereo FM radio and a number of other luxury features (power windows, etc.), but mainly the GT was an appearance package in 1974.

The first generation Celica used the confusingly-labelled 18R 2.0 liter engine, which produced 86-89 hp, and 105-107 lb-feet of torque; an 18R-C variant was sold in California from 1971 to 1974, producing 97 horsepower and 106 lb-ft of torque.

In 1975, the Celica was given the 20R engine under a “power dome” hood, with a nice performance boost in both horsepower and torque (it also lost the oil pressure gauge). Peak torque was at a low 2,800 rpm, and at 55 mph the engine turned at 2,650 rpm, close to that peak torque so that passing without downshifting was not a problem; low-end torque was said to be good down to 1,500 rpm, making the 20R very, very different from the engine powering the current Corolla XRS (or the final Celicas). The Celica combined a good ride (thanks to long suspension travel) with good traction, but understeer could be a serious problem on the rear-drive car, and the lack of power steering sometimes led to considerable effort on the GT (the base ST model, with thinner tires, required less steering-wheel work). The standard transmission was a four-speed manual or three-speed automatic, with the five-speed stick standard on the GT.

Standard tires were 165/70R13s. Cosmetic on the GT enhancements included a blackened grille and hood power bulge, along with 185/70 tires on 13” wheels. The passenger seat had a mechanical memory feature so that it did not have to be readjusted fore-aft each time the seat back was folded to let rear passengers in. Comfortable cloth seats were standard on the base model; the GT had a "breathing" knitted vinyl.

Snapshot: 1975-76 Toyota Celica
 

The GT was advertised as an all-out sports car, with wide-tread radials, full synchromesh five-speed overdrive transmission, and stripes; the ST as “a little more docile, but not so much,” a “young, sporty machine at a trim, small-car price,” with an automatic or four-speed manual. The hood had a power dome to fit the engine, and vents to cool it; while the trunk was surprisingly capacious for a sporty hardtop, especially when compared with the 1974-81 Camaros.  


The new 20-R engine featured electronic ignition (still new, having first been used in 1971 by Chrysler Corporation), “less tubing and plumbing,” fewer moving parts, and emissions well within regulations. Toyota claimed, with justification, “the silkiest stick in the business.” Unusually, the Celica also used an electric fuel pump for steady pressures. (See our 20R engine page for more.)

The new front end had curves and flares, with an aerodynamic front spoiler. The simulated woodgrain dash and console, then de rigeur, included a standard tachometer, which was still moderately unusual.

Standard safety features included a steel box beam welded inside the doors, an impact-opposing roof despite hardtop styling, collapsible steering column, padding, recessed hardware, fire retardant materials, electric rear defroster, large tail-lights, lockable gas cap, two speed wiper/washer, large exterior mirror, power front disc brakes, and day-night rear view mirror.

Comfort features included an FM stereo, clock, and carpet on the scuff panel, carpeted trunk, interior hood release, courtesy lights, carpet-trimmed door panels, high-back reclining bucket seat, aluminized muffler and tailpipe, color-keyed interior, tool-kit, tinted glass, touch-up paint, full carpeting, and trip odometer. On the GT, buyers got a leather-wrapped wheel and stick-shift knob, wide radials, the five-speed stick, and a big stripe. On the ST, buyers got a three-spoke simulated woodgrain steering wheel and shift knob; fabrics were different on the three levels. Options included air, automatic (ST only), weather guard, eight-track, door edge guards, rear deck luggage rack, and floor mats.

Coil springs with double-action hydraulic shocks were used on all four wheels; the front torsion-bar stabilizer helped keep the vehicle level on corners. The rear four-link trailing arm suspension with lateral rods provided good axle control and rear wheel tracking. The MacPherson strut independent front suspension was light in weight, and stayed in adjustment.

The 1976 Celica was similar, but included standard steel-belted radials on then-large fourteen inch wheels. Each vehicle, according to Toyota, was tested or inspected 17 different ways when it rolled off the line.

 

(See the Specifications section as well.)

Back to the Toyota Celica cars
In 1978, the Celica grew up a little, with a softer ride (and less capable cornering) and heavier weight that lowered gas mileage, but with better aerodynamics, increased interior space, less noise, and better stability and acceleration. The Celica had very little rear seat room, though front passenger space and trunk space were both good. The American-specification Celica had unit-body construction, MacPherson struts with coil springs and double-acting hydraulic shocks up front, a five-link suspension with track-bar, coil springs, and double-acting hydraulic shocks in back, all stopped by standard power front disc brakes with rear drums. The engine was a single overhead cam 2.2 liter model pushing out 95 horsepower and 122 lb-ft of torque, getting 20 mpg in the city but 34 in the highway with its five-speed manual transmission. There were three models in the US - GT Liftback, GT Sport Coupe, and ST Sport Coupe. All had a standard electronic ignition, FM radio, reclining front bucket seats, carpet, and styled steel wheels.

In 1981, the Celica Supra appeared, using a longer version of the Celica body (largely to fit the higher-power six-cylinder engine). Two-barrel carburetors were standard until 1981 on both the 2.2 (134 cid) liter four-cylinder engine, which pushed out 90-95 hp, and on the 2.6 liter in-line six, which produced 116-121 hp. In 1981, choices changed to a 2.4 liter four with 96 hp and, for the Supra, an inline 2.8 liter six-cylinder engine with fuel injection, producing 116 hp. Earlier versions of this generation (1978-79) had round headlights and chrome bumpers in base models; in 1980 Toyota switched to the fashionable square headlights and black rubberized bumpers.

Snapshot: 1982 Celica
The big news for 1982 may have been the greater differentiation of the Celica Supra with its own straight-six engine; the Celica GT-S (introduced after the other Celicas) shared the Supra’s independent rear suspension.

The 1982 Celicas kept the proven 2.4 liter (144 cubic inch) 22-R engine that pushed out 96 horsepower with a two-barrel carburetor or, in GT and GT-S trim, 105 horsepower with electronic fuel injection (that would rise to 116 hp by 1985); Australian models used a lower power 21C engine. The electronic fuel injection, not surprisingly, also increased gas mileage, and provided a convenient diagnostic and warning system. The single overhead cam engine had a 9:1 compression ratio, and the carbureted version pushed out 129 lb-ft of torque at 2,800 rpm (the 96 hp was at 4,800 rpm). Ignition was electronic, and the carburetor used a primary-secondary system for economy - you could get better mileage by not opening the secondary. Final drive ratios were increased to raise gas mileage. A large capacity radiator with seven bladed fan and slip clutch was used for good cooling, and reservoirs were visible for easy maintenance. The helical cylinder head intake port did a better job of fuel mixing, while a large intake manifold, intake and exhaust valve diameters contribute to performance.


All Celicas came with Toyota's 5-speed manual overdrive transmission standard, with GT models also offering an optional 4-speed automatic overdrive transmission. The GT-S model (in 1982, Liftback only) came with an independent rear suspension “providing the ultimate in Celica sportiness.” The GT-S used 225/60HR14 tires with raised black letters, aluminum alloy wheels, multi-adjustable sport seats, and fender flares. Base tires were 175SR14 on ST, 185/70SR14 on GT.

 

The Sport Coupe GT and GT-S models had an extra latch for a completely lockable storage area in the trunk. Liftback models added a cargo cover to keep valuables out of sight. All GT and GT-S models had a new power group option that includes power windows, power door locks, cruise control and a unique door trim. Other GT/GT-S options included two-tone paint schemes, an electric sliding steel sunroof, and an AM/FM/MPX 5-speaker stereo tuner with amplifier and graphic equalizer.

The 1982 Celica had the lowest drag coefficient of any Japanese production car, at 0.342 in the liftback and .38 in the coupe - good for the time (and not even bad for the 21st Century) though amusingly far higher than the huge 1970 Dodge Charger Daytona, which had clocked in at 0.28, or (in the case of the coupe) current Toyota trucks. However, Toyota would continue to pursue aerodynamics - and Dodge would not return to aero design until the 1990s. The wedge shape was complemented by retractable halogen headlamps which helped to cheat the wind.

The 1982 redesign was not only skin deep; there was also new suspension geometry (with MacPherson struts), new rack and pinion steering, new vented front disc brakes, rich new interior trim and appointments, and plenty of options. Optional power steering supplied a variable power boost to the new rack and pinion system. The color-keyed front bumper was soft outside, but had a steel shock-absorbing bumper underneath; the rear bumper was black urethane. Dual mirrors (both remote controlled) on the GT were integrated into the body design. The door handles were now flush and painted matte black; wide body-side moldings were added for rust prevention on the GT along with standard plastic fender liners on all models. Aluminum alloy wheels were a high-tech looking option on GT, and came with comfortable but moderately sporty P185/75SR14 radials. Base tires were given wider tread.

The Liftback had 25.8 cubic feet of carpeted cargo space with the two seat-backs lowered. The rear window defogger was standard, and a cargo compartment light and luggage strap were also provided in the Liftback.Liftback options include a rear wiper/washer, shade kit, sun roof, and two-tone. On all models, the windshield washer was improved with dual streams.

Inside, a unique tensioner drew the seat belt away from both the driver and the front passenger to prevent tangling. Head and leg room were more than any other Toyota except Supra - 37.4" and 43.0" respectively.

 

Gauges in the GTs gave accurate oil pressure, voltage and engine rpm readings, as well as coolant temperature and low fuel warnings. Running lights and windshield wiper/washer controls were column-mounted. A resettable trip meter was standard. The ST had a quartz analog clock, the GTs a digital quartz clock. Optional Cruise Control (GTs) had a switch mounted on the left of the instrument hood. The electronic AM/FM/stereo with 5 speakers was a GT standard, and it could be upgraded with a more powerful unit. Tilt-wheel was standard on GT. Both front seats reclined, and in the GTs the driver had a six-way adjustable seat with lumbar support adjustment. Remote controls included a fuel door release in all GTs, a hatch release for the Liftback, and electric remote dual mirror controls in the GTs. The inside mirror was adjustable for day or night driving. For the driver, there was a handy left-side footrest.

Ventilation included power assisted flow, and an air-mix 4-speed heater/defroster with additional vents under both sides of the dash and a left-right adjustment to help balance air flow. Side demisters and a rear window defogger helped keep vision clear.

Fold-down split rear seat-backs in the Liftback could be lowered singly or together. The GT Sport Coupe had folding rear seat backs to provide access to the trunk and room to carry long objects. Automatic locking seat belt retractors in the rear simplified the installation of child restraint seats. The overhead illumination system (GT) had a delay feature.

The 5-speed manual overdrive for Celica featured new gear ratios, lowered slightly to increase power. Housed in a lightweight aluminum gear case, there was increased efficiency in the new system. It retained a 0.783:1 overdrive gear. The unusual four-speed automatic had a similar overdrive gear, around .7:1, with a lockout button.

Front-end suspension geometry underwent notable changes. The MacPherson strut configuration was retained, but the relationships between shock absorber and spring angle, and angle of attachment to the wheel, changed to provide a sporty new sense of handling. New front tread width, 1.8 inches wider than on 1981 models, contributed to the handling balance. 4-link rear suspension employed coil springs instead of the customary leaf springs, and had pairs of upper and lower control arms linked to the chassis at four points. The result was more precise rear wheel tracking for better handling, and longer spring travel for a more comfortable ride. Movement was dampened by double-acting shock absorbers that help restrain both thrust and re­coil. A rear stabilizer bar enhanced the sporty feel by cutting down on rear end sway.

Back to the story of the Toyota Celica
For 1983, the GT-S Sport Coupe was added to the American lineup, making five models - ST Sport Coupe, GT Sport Coupe and Liftback, and GT-S Liftback and Sport Coupe (the latter new for 1983). Toyota claimed there were “several body and chassis refinements” for 1983. To quote: “The new GT-S models have...Sport Seats with an eight-way adjustable driver’s seat, independent rear suspension, and sporty fender flares with 225/60HR14 low profile tires and 14” x 7” aluminum alloy wheels. At the heart of every sleek, sporty GT-S and GT model is the most powerful Celica engine ever - a 2.4 liter single overhead cam powerplant, now with Electronic Fuel Injection, for even better performance and economy.” It was hooked up to a close-ratio five-speed overdrive manual transmission.

 

In 1984, Celica had five models in both liftback and super coupe styling, as in 1983; the drag coefficient (cD) was 0.34, low for the time, thanks to concealed headlights, a front air dam, and a rear deck spoiler. The GT-S featured full instrumentation, eight-way adjustable driver seat, and five-speaker stereo.

A convertible was added in 1985, at a rather stunning (for the time) $17,000. Engines through this generation used manually adjusted valves with a roughly 15,000 mile maintenance interval that could trip up modern owners, especially since American cars had switched to hydraulic valves fairly early.

In 1986, the Celica moved to front wheel drive to increase interior space (though the rear seats remained vestigial), and went to a smaller 2.0 liter engine (twin cam, with 16 valves and electronic fuel injection) which beat the old 2.4’s power slightly, producing 97 hp; that engine didn't last long before it was replaced with two versions of the same basic engine, boasting twin cams and 115 hp (there was also a 135 hp version for the GT-S, that delivered power mainly when revved high). Variable-assist power steering and bucket seats helped to make the Celica fun to drive, and leather was available for those who wanted it.  
1990 Toyota Celica GT4 (GT All-Trac) review
 


The big news for this generation was the Celica All-Trac, a turbocharged hatchback starting in 1988 with a massive 190 horsepower, nearly 10 hp/cc and neatly beating all domestic four-cylinders until the 224 hp Dodge Turbo III came out in 1991; even in 2007, 190 horsepower from a four-cylinder is impressive. The All-Trac, which used a fluid-driven all drive system, also had optional antilock brakes.

The 1990 Celica was restyled to be much curvier, keeping the same wheelbase but adding three inches of length; the lineup included a coupe, hatchback, and convertible (showing up in 1991). The ST engine went down to 1.6 liters, keeping the twin cams, while pushing out a still-decent but not quite sporty 103 hp; the 2.0 liter engine used in the GT and GT-S raised that to a more respectable 130-135 hp, while the 2.0 liter turbo engine in the All-Trac managed 10 hp per cc (200 hp), better than any American car in 1990 and nearly as high as the rare Turbo III. The base transmission for any engine was the five-speed stick, which made Celicas feel quite peppy; the four-speed automatic made the ST sluggish and took some of the fun out of the GT/GT-S. The All-Trac was not offered with an automatic. Cornering was improved over the prior generation, with a good solid road feel. This was the first year of the high beltline that would make later Celicas a bit hard to see out of. This series would continue through 1993.

Have you seen our page on the Celica V8 conversion?
For the sixth generation started in 1994 , Toyota concentrated more on cornering and feel. The models were ST and GT in the US, with a sports/handling package available for the the GT that was actually called GT-S in Canada. The Celica gained quad headlights, and were available as coupes or liftbacks. The All-Trac was no longer sold in the US, but gained considerable power in Japan and Australia, with a stunning 240 - 250 hp - hitting the limits of front wheel drive traction. The “GT-Four” (the name it used in Japan and Australia) included weight savings such as an aluminum hood, along with a special suspension and four-channel antilock brakes.

Aerodynamics were improved in 1996 with optional side skirts; the rear spoiler was also redesigned. The ST would be dropped in 1998, the coupes in 1999, as sales stayed low. The GT Coupe was converted to a convertible in 1995 and later years by an American company.

The final generation started with the 2000 model year, keeping just the liftbacks and the GT and GT-S models, with a base 140 hp engine and a GT-S 180 hp engine engineered with Yamaha (the makers of the Ford Taurus SHO engine). That 180 hp engine made its way into the Corolla XRS and the Matrix XRS; with variable valve timing and variable lift, it is fairly sluggish at low rpm but quite exciting at higher engine speeds (it requires premium gas). Toyota made a serious investment in the seventh generation, increasing the wheelbase while decreasing the length to bring back its cornering edge as well as working on the new engine. However, the last cars were made in 2004, for the 2005 model year; the Celica was not replaced, though the Scion tC fulfills its former function as a quick (albeit less quick, and more affordable) coupe. (ne0z wrote: “if you study the chassis codes on Toyota vehicles, the replacement for the Celica was the Scion tC.”)

The GTS with manual transmission could beat 7 seconds 0-60, with the GT-automatic coming in about a second slower; using air conditioning or going uphill sapped the power of either engine a bit, given their relatively low torque and the high engine speeds needed to get to their power peaks. The interior was moderately comfortable for the class, though a bit cramped (and forget about using the vestigial rear seats), with the sense of looking out of a bathtub (not as bad as the Audi TT coupe). For a Toyota, the Celica was surprisingly noisy, with firmer than usual suspensions that reflected every road surface jiggle. Cargo space was actually surprisingly good in terms of volume, but not necessarily set up in a useful shape and form.

And now for some some specs!

Toyota Celica engines by generation (provided by Matt Yi)
1st generation (1970-1977)
Have you seen our page on the Celica V8 conversion? How about our Toyota engines page?
- 2T, 1.6L, carburetor, OHV
- 2T-B, 1.6L, twin-Solex carburetor, OHV
- 2T-R, 1.6L, twin-Solex carburetor, DOHC
- 8R, 1.9L engine, carburetor, SOHC
- 18R, 2.0L engine, carburetor, SOHC
- 20R, 2.2L engine, carburetor, SOHC, 90-96 hp (replaced 18R in 1975)
2nd generation (1978-1981)
- 20R, 2.2L engine, carburetor, SOHC

3rd generation (1982-1985)
- 2S-G, 2.0L, carburetor, SOHC

- 22RE, 2.4L, fuel injected, SOHC

Japanese market:
Celica GT, 4A-GE, 1.6L, fuel injected, DOHC

Celica GT-S, 3S-GE, 2.0L, fuel injected, DOHC

4th generation (1986-1989)
- 2S-E, 2.0L, fuel injected, SOHC

- 3S-FE, 2.0L, fuel injected, SOHC

- 3S-GTE, 2.0L, fuel injected, DOHC, turbocharged, fulltime four wheel drive

Trims and chassis codes

- ST = ST161

- GT = ST162

- GT-S = ST162

- All-Trac (USDM)/GT-Four(JDM) = ST165

5th generation (1990-1993)
1990 Toyota Celica GT4 (GT All-Trac) review
- 5S-FE, 2.2L, fuel injected, DOHC

- 4A-FE, 1.6L. fuel injected, DOHC

- 3S-GTE, 2.0L, fuel injected, DOHC, turbocharged

6th generation (1994-1999)
- 7A-FE, 1.8L, fuel injected, DOHC

- 5S-FE, 2.2L, fuel injected, DOHC

7th generation (2000-2005 model years)
- 1ZZ-FED, 1.8L, fuel injected, DOHC, VVT-i

- 2ZZ-GE, 1.8L, fuel injected. DOHC, VVTL-i

The Celica ceased production in 2004, after making some vehicles for the 2005 model year. Sales were:

52,406 units in 2000
14,856 units in 2003
8,216 units in 2004
Toyota Celica specifications
 1975-77  1978-81 1982-85 2000-2005
Wheelbase 95.5 98.4 98.4 102.4
Length 171.5 173.6 176.2 Coupe
176.6 Liftback
 170.5
Width 63.4 64.6 65.6 68.3
Height 51.4 51 52.0 51.4
Weight 2,482 - 2,550   2,496 - 2,705 2,425 - 2,580  
Turning diameter  32.8    
Gas tank  13.2 gal    
Brake disc f/r  9” / 9”    
Tread, front   54.9 (GT-S, 56.5)  
Tread, rear   53.7 (GT-S, 56.5)  
Legroom, f/r   43.0/25.4  
Headroom, front   37.4  
Headroom, rear   37.0 Coupe, 35.6 Lift  
Base engine   22-R (2.2 SOHC) 22-R (2.4 SOHC) 1ZZ-FED (1.8 DOHC
Valve notes    16-valve VVT-i  
C/R, bore x stroke   9:1, 3.62 x 3.50  
Base horsepower  95@4,800 96@4,800 140 @ 6,400  
Base torque  122@2,400 129 @ 2,800 125 @ 4,200  
Base mpg: Stick
Base mpg: Auto  20/34 stick
22/27
  28/34
27/34
Opt. engine   Same, w/EFI 2ZZ-GE (GT-S)
Opt. horsepower   105 @ 4,800 180 @ 7,600  
Opt. torque   137 @ 2,800 130 @ 6,800  
Opt. mpg: Stick
Opt. mpg: Auto    24/32
24/30

* Liftback 176.6. ** GT-S, 67.7

Second generation (1978 introduction)
See above for basic dimensions. GT Liftback and Sport Coupe tires, 185/70SR14. ST Sport Coupe tires, 175/70SR14. Steel belted radials in all cases. California horsepower: 90 @ 4,800.

Third generation / 1982-1985
See table, plus...
Curb Weight: 2496 Ibs. (ST) 2566 Ibs. (GT Liftback) 2705 Ibs. (GT-S Liftback)
Differential Ratio: 3.417:1 (SSM): 3.583 (4SA)
Capacities - Fuel: 16.1 gal. Oil: 4.0 qts. Cooling system: 8.9 qts.


Seventh generation / 2000-2005, from Matt Yi
Transmission: standard 5-speed manual or 4-speed electronically controlled transmission (ECT) optional

Standard Equipment

- Aerodynamic projector beam/multi-reflector halogen headlamps with Daytime Running Lights and auto on/off
- Color-keyed bumpers and door handles
- Dual color-keyed power outside mirrors
- Washer-linked intermittent windshield wipers
- Tinted glass
- P195/60R15 tires on 15" steel wheels with full wheel cover
- Heavy-duty electric rear window defogger
- Instrument cluster with tachometer (digital LCD fuel gauge and odometer with twin tripmeters, oil pressure)
- Digital quartz clock
- Dual sun visors with driver and passenger vanity mirror
- Tilt steering wheel
- Driver and passenger front air bag Supplemental Restraint System (SRS)
- CFC-free air conditioning
- Fabric-trimmed 6-way adjustable front sport seats
- 50/50 split/fold-down rear seat
- Fabric door trim with integrated speakers and dual map pockets
- Center console with storage compartment
- Dual front and rear cup holders
- Hood and fuel-filler door releases
- Deluxe 3-in-1 AM/FM ETR/Cassette/CD with 6 speakers
Option Packages

- Upgrade Package - includes power windows and door locks, and cruise control
- Cold Area Package - includes heavy-duty battery and starter motor, and intermittent rear window wiper
- 15" 5-spoke aluminum alloy wheels
- Anti-lock Brake System (ABS)
- Power tilt/slide moonroof with retained power and sunshade
- Rear spoiler and fog lamps
- Driver and passenger front seat-mounted side-impact air bag Supplemental Restraint System (SRS)
- Premium 3-in-1 AM/FM ETR/Cassette/CD with 8 speakers
Celica GT-S
Transmission: 6-speed manual -standard; 4-speed Sportshift electronically controlled transmission (ECT) -available

Standard Equipment (GT Standard Equipment plus)

- Integrated fog lamps
- P205/55R15 tires on 15" 5-spoke aluminum alloy wheels
- Cold Area Package - includes heavy-duty battery and starter motor, and intermittent rear window wiper
- Drilled aluminum pedals
- Leather-wrapped steering wheel and manual shift lever
- Cruise control
- Power windows with retained power and driver's auto-down feature -Power door locks with anti-lockout feature
- Premium 3-in-1 AM/FM ETR/Cassette/CD with 8 speakers
Additional Options

- P205/50R16 tires on 16" 5-spoke aluminum alloy wheels
- Anti-lock Brake System (ABS)
- Power tilt/slide moonroof with retained power and sunshade
- Rear spoiler
- Leather-trimmed sport sea
- Driver and passenger front seat-mounted side-impact air bag Supplemental Restraint System (SRS)
- Hood hold-down hooks
- Side-impact door beams
- Daytime Running Lights (DRL) with auto on/off feature
- Anti-lock Brake System (ABS) -available
- Driver and front passenger air bag Supplemental Restraint System (SRS)
- Driver and front passenger seat-mounted side impact air bag (SRS) -available
- 3-point seatbelts in all seating positions
- Emergency Locking Retractor (ELR) on driver's belt, Automatic/Emergency Locking Retractors (ALR/ELR) on all other seatbelts
- Adjustable front seatbelt shoulder anchors
- Soft upper interior trim
Accessories

- Front-end mask
- Gold Emblem Package
- Wheel locks
- Center console armrest
- Carpeted floor mats
- RS3200 Security System
- Cargo net
- 6-disc trunk-mounted CD changer
Color & Trim: White, silver, red, spectra or carbon blue, black; interior, black or black with silver, red, or blue cloth, and, for GT-S only, black leather trim.

Powertrain and other specs where the GT and GT-S differ
Feature GT GT-S
Valve timing  Variable, with intelligence  Variable valve timing and lift with intelligence  
Compression ratio  10.0:1 11.5:1
Ignition Direct; multiple point  Direct; multiple point
Horsepower 140 hp @ 6,400 rpm 180 hp @ 7,600 rpm
Torque 125 lb.-ft. @ 4,200 rpm 130 lb.-ft. @ 6,800 rpm
Manual transmission  5-speed  6-speed  
Automatic transmission  4-speed electronically controlled (ECT) 4-speed Sportshift electronically controlled (ECT)  
Bore and stroke  79.0 mm x 91.5 mm 82.0 mm x 85.0 mm
Brakes Power-assisted with 10.0" ventilated front disc/rear drum Power-assisted with 10.8" ventilated front disc/10.6" solid rear disc
Weight 2,425-2,460 lbs.
 2,500-2,580 lbs.
EPA mileage, manual  28/34 24/32
EPA mileage, auto 27/34
 24/30

Other specifications
Front suspension  Independent MacPherson strut front suspension
Rear suspension  Double wishbone
Steering Rack-and-pinion with power-assist, 36.1 ft turning circle  
Width 68.3 inches  
Length 170.5
Height 51.4
Wheelbase 102.4
Ground clearance  5.5
Tread width  58.6 front, 58.2 rear  
Drag coefficient (cd)  0.32
Headroom 38.4/35.0
Shoulder room  52.6/50.6
Hip room  51.3/46.8
Leg room  33.3/25.4
Passenger volume  76.3-78.3 (w/out moonroof)  
Cargo volume  16.9 cubic feet  
Gas tank  14.5
Wheels 15 inch, steel or aluminum alloy  
Tires P195/60 or P205/55 or P205/50  

Pricing (with destination charge)
 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002
GT manual          $17,185 $17,440 $17,570
GT automatic          $17,980 $18,240 $18,370
GT-S manual          $21,650 $21,910 $22,040
GT-S automatic          $22,350 $22,610 $22,740

More to come especially if you send it in!
 
Ambition is a Dream with a V8 Engine -Elvis Presley

     1984 Celica GT-S Fastback *Charlotte*
                           Modifications
Hedman Hedders
2" exhaust system with loud muffler
Polished Aluminum Valve cover
Alpine 400w Bridged amp
twin JBL 10" Subs in Bandpass box
Sony Xplod speakers
Racing steering wheel
TRD Short Shifter
LED's under the dash
Open element filter with supra AFM
LSD
http://s100.photobucket.com/albums/m35/celicaturtle/

Offline celicaturtle

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Post Cool Celica History Here
« Reply #21 on: May 10, 2007, 04:26:48 pm »
Ambition is a Dream with a V8 Engine -Elvis Presley

     1984 Celica GT-S Fastback *Charlotte*
                           Modifications
Hedman Hedders
2" exhaust system with loud muffler
Polished Aluminum Valve cover
Alpine 400w Bridged amp
twin JBL 10" Subs in Bandpass box
Sony Xplod speakers
Racing steering wheel
TRD Short Shifter
LED's under the dash
Open element filter with supra AFM
LSD
http://s100.photobucket.com/albums/m35/celicaturtle/

Offline 83GTCoupe

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Post Cool Celica History Here
« Reply #22 on: Sep 25, 2007, 03:42:06 am »
History on the Celica, and turbo's. I did a search for 82 models to get specs. Cool reading here.

82 Turbo Celica and specs
"There are only three types of people: Those who MAKE it happen, Those who WATCH it happen, and Those who wonder... "What just happened?" TimmyRigTech Snooch to the nooch!

Offline dead91silvia

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Post Cool Celica History Here
« Reply #23 on: Mar 09, 2008, 12:13:12 am »
« Last Edit: Mar 09, 2008, 12:14:00 am by dead91silvia »
Home in Tukwila!!!

Original name:
Dead83celi
post:2260
'98 Subaru Legacy 2.5GT Limited (daily)
JDM 91 Nissan Pulsar GTiR
'67 Chevy 3/4 ton (work truck with balls)
'66 Volvo 122 (The project with Nissan motor)
'80 Datsun 720
'94Toyota 2WD truck w/4Runner nose
 

Offline tig321

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Post Cool Celica History Here
« Reply #24 on: Jun 16, 2008, 10:21:03 am »
This maybe a repost but who cares, it's worth seeing twice.
You can't look at these pics and not be impressed with the level of quality workmanship that went into this car.
Mäkelä Auto-Tuning

Offline a2ndopinion

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Post Cool Celica History Here
« Reply #25 on: Jun 16, 2008, 01:25:07 pm »
Yeah, it is a repost, and yeah, it is worth looking at at least twice! :lick:
ASE certified: Master Auto, Truck, Machinist & Collision Repair/Refinish Tech/Damage Estimator, Undercar & Parts Specialist, Service Advisor; Oregon Certified Vehicle Appraiser
DD - '81 Corona wagon - Weber, Cannon, MSD, Thorley, Magnaflow cat, 2.25" mandrel bent, Dynomax Bullet, Borla Pro XS, RA6x front suspension, Cressi Big Brakes, Mk II Addco, T3 RCAs & camber plates, coilovers, SW20/Camaro AGXs front/rear, all urethane bushings, Hilux overlloads...

Offline OldMage

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Post Cool Celica History Here
« Reply #26 on: Jun 16, 2008, 03:12:02 pm »
Locking before we have a huge thread discussing it AGAIN.

Thanks much, but this IS the 3rd (or so) repost of this.  Maybe I'll move this thread to the "Cool Celica History" sticky...


'83 Celica GT-S coupe - EFI hybrid
'03 Prius - DD/corner-carver

My Home Page My Photobucket

Offline OldMage

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Post Cool Celica History Here
« Reply #27 on: Jun 16, 2008, 04:59:34 pm »
I don't think this belongs in "Off Topic".

This IS the topic of these forums.
moving to "General Discussion"


'83 Celica GT-S coupe - EFI hybrid
'03 Prius - DD/corner-carver

My Home Page My Photobucket

Offline Dougs85GT

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« Reply #28 on: Aug 02, 2008, 02:44:46 pm »
AAR's Celica turbo

GTU Class 1983 - 1985
     
IMSA Sports Car Championship
     
10 wins - 8 pole positions ( 17 additional podiums)
     
Car: Toyota Celica (AAR version).
     
Winners: Dennis Aase, Chris Cord, Wally Dallenbach Jr., Boy Hayje.
     
Other drivers: Jim Adams, Michael Chandler, Mike and Scott Gillman,
 Whitney Ganz, Kaoru Hoshino, Gene Hackman, Margie Smith-Haas,
 Roberto Moreno, Masanori Sekia, Al Unser Jr., Willy T. Ribbs.

« Last Edit: Aug 02, 2008, 02:46:41 pm by misery »


 

cognitive